Rising BIA Upper School Summer Reading (6th, 7th and 8th Graders)

BIA upper school ELA teachers have assembled summer reading lists and developed meaningful projects to extend your learning. 

Every student will be expected to read a minimum of three books from the list over the summer:  the required selection and then your choice of two other selections from your grade level’s list.  In addition, you will be expected to complete the project associated with the required selection prior to the first day of school. Each student should also read at least two additional selections from their respective list and complete a reading journal entry for those selections.  All projects and journals are to be submitted to your new ELA teacher upon your return to school.

Please review the attached summer reading list and project description for your grade level.  This information will also be posted on the BIA website, as well.  We hope you will have an enjoyable summer. 

Happy Reading!

Required Reading and Projects

Rising 6th Grade: 

Novel:  Number the Stars by Lois Lowry

Project:  Book in a Box Project

Rising 7th Grade:

Novel:  The Diary of a Young Girl by Anne Frank

Project:  Backpack Project

Rising 8th Grade:

Novel:  A Midsummer Night’s Dream by William Shakespeare

Project:  Choice of one:  Video news broadcast or newspaper article, create a comic book or graphic novel, create a wanted poster and a “file” on Puck, fashion designer, wedding planner, or adapt as a children’s book.

***All students should also read two additional selections from the provided reading lists and a complete a journal entry for each.***

Reading, projects, and journal entries are to be completed over the summer break.  Please be prepared to discuss your reading and submit your project and journal entries to your new ELA teacher when you return to school.

6th Grade

Suggested Lexile Range

780L to 1040L

GA College & Career Ready
“Stretch” Lexile Bands

925L to 1070L

Title

Author Last Name

Author First Name

Lexile Level

Required Selection

Number the Stars

Lowry

Lois

670L

Fiction

A Monster Calls

Ness

Patrick

730L

Bad Boy

Myers

Walter Dean

970L

Boy in Striped Pajamas, The

Boyne

John

1010L

Breadwinner, The

Ellis

Deborah

650L

Call of the Wild

London

Jack

990L

Fever 1793

Anderson

Laurie Halse

580L

Great Fire, The

Clements

Gillian

610L

Hatchet

Paulsen

Gary

1020L

Moon Over Manifes

Vanderpool

Clare

800L

Old Man and The Sea, The

Hemingway

Ernest

940L

Prince and the Pauper, The

Twain

Mark

620L

Princess Bride, The

Goldman

William

870L

Red Pony, The

Steinbeck

John

810L

Redwall

Jacques

Brian

800L

Treasure Island

Stevenson

Robert Louis

760L

Watership Down

Adams

Richard

880L

Westing Game, The

Raskin

Ellen

750L

When You Reach Me

Stead

Rebecca

750L

Biography

Revolutionary John Adams, The

Harness

Cheryl

1130L

Limitless

Tinari

Leah

Distance Between Us, The

Grande

Reyna

780L

Ben Franklin’s Almanac

Fleming

Candance

1000L

Woodsong

Paulsen

Gary

1030L

6th Grade Project - Book in a Box Number the Stars

During the summer break, read Number the Stars by Lois Lowry and then complete the” book in a box project.”  Your project will be due on the first day of school.  Please bring it with you and submit it to your new ELA teacher.  Please be prepared to discuss the story and present your project to an audience. 

The Project:
Decorate a box to represent the book and fill it with objects that represent different parts of the book.

 The Details:
You can use a shoebox, oatmeal canister, coffee can or other similarly sized container for this project.

  • Decorate your box to go with the book. You can draw pictures yourself or use pictures from magazines or the internet. Be sure to include the title and author of the book on the box as well as your name.
  • Find at least 8 different objects. You can use pictures if the object you want to use is too big to fit inside your box.
  • For each object, make a note card that includes the name of the object at the top and a paragraph about how the object is and important part of the book.
    Tips for Success: 
    As you read the book, keep a list of ideas for objects that you might want to use for this project.
    If you use pictures, glue them onto cardboard backings to make them more durable and appealing.

Try to find at least one object for each chapter of the book

 

Citing Evidence: 

This year you will be learning about citing evidence and using it in your writing to support your arguments.  Use this form to keep track of important ideas, thoughts, questions, and words while you read the book. If you fold it in half and in half again, it makes a handy bookmark. That way you will always have your notes nearby.

Notes: 

                   

Quote                                                                                                                                  Page No.

  1.  _______________________________________________________________________________
  2. _______________________________________________________________________________ 
  3. _______________________________________________________________________________ 
  4. _______________________________________________________________________________ 
  5. _______________________________________________________________________________ 
  6. _______________________________________________________________________________ 
  7. _______________________________________________________________________________ 
  8. _______________________________________________________________________________ 
  9. _______________________________________________________________________________ 
  10. _______________________________________________________________________________ 
  11. _______________________________________________________________________________ 
  12. _______________________________________________________________________________ 
  13. _______________________________________________________________________________ 
  14. _______________________________________________________________________________ 
  15. _______________________________________________________________________________ 
  16. _______________________________________________________________________________ 
  17. _______________________________________________________________________________ 
  18. _______________________________________________________________________________ 
  19. _______________________________________________________________________________ 
  20. _______________________________________________________________________________ 
  21. _______________________________________________________________________________ 
  22. _______________________________________________________________________________ 
  23. _______________________________________________________________________________ 
  24. _______________________________________________________________________________ 
  25. ______________________________________________________________________________

6th Grade Project – Book in a Box – Rubric
Number the Stars

 

Name:  _______________________________________________________________________

Due Date:  ____________________________________________________________________

Title of Book:  __________________________________________________________________

 

Overall

• At least 8 objects were included.

• Each object has a note card with title and paragraph.

• Shoe box is decorated.

 

Quality

• Note cards are neat with correct paragraph form, spelling,

grammar and punctuation.

• Shoebox is appealing. Care was taken with work.

 

Accuracy

• Objects represent important elements in the story.

• Note cards explain importance of each object.

• Shoebox is decorated appropriately; title and author are prominently displayed.

 

Teacher Comments:

                                                                                                            Total Score

 

 

Created by Rachel Lynette ©2012-2015 all rights reserved www.rachel-lynette.com

7th Grade Suggested Lexile Range: 830L to 1090L GA College & Career Ready "Stretch Lexile Bands 970L to 1120L

7th Grade

Suggested Lexile Range

830L to 1090L

GA College & Career Ready
“Stretch” Lexile Bands

970L to 1120L

Title

Author Last Name

Author First Name

Lexile Level

Required Selection

The Diary of a Young Girl

Frank

Anne

950L

Fiction

Air Raid – Pearl Harbor!

Taylor

Theodore

1070L

Great Gatsby, The

Fitzgerald

F. Scott

1010L

Journey to the Center of the Earth

Verne

Jules

1030L

War of the Worlds

Wells

H.G.

1040L

Shipwreck at the Bottom of the World

Armstrong

Shapiro

1090L

Sword and the Stone

White

T.H.

1120L

Brian’s Hunt

Paulsen

Gary

1120L

Wizard of Oz, The

Baum

Frank

460L

Star Girl

Spinelli

Jerry

590L

Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian

Alexie

Sherman

600L

Adventures of Tom Sawyer

Twain

Mark

640L

White Fang

London

Jack

650L

Death on the Nile

 Christie

Agatha

660L

Adventure of Sherlock Holmes

Doyle

Arthur Conan

660L

When My Name was Keoko

Park

Linda Sue

670L

Anne of Green Gables

Montgomery

Lucy Maud

760L

Summer of My German Soldier

Green

Bette

800L

My Side of the Moutain

George

Jean Craighead

810L

Chocolate War, The

Cormier

Robert

820L

For Whom the Bell Tolls

Hemingway

Ernest

840L

20,000 Leagues Under the Sea

Verne

Jules

860L

House on Mango Street, The

Cisneros

Sandra

870L

Hiding Place, The

Ten Boom

Corrie

900L

The Green Angel

Hoffman

Alice

910L

Little Women

Alcott

Louisa May

950L

Complete Maus, The

Spiegelman

Art

GN

They Poured Fire On Us From the Sky

Ajak & Deng

Benjamin & Benson

Lord of the Rings

 Tolkien

J.R.

Biography

A Time to Act

Corey

Shana

850L

Boy on the Wooden Box, The

Leyson

Leon

1000L

Little Green

Yu

Chun

900L

Photo by Brady

Armstrong

Jennifer

1200L

7th Grade Project - Backpack Project A Diary of a Young Girl

During the summer break, read A Diary of a Young  by Anne Frank and then complete the backpack project.  Your project will be due on the first day of school.  Please bring it with you and submit it to your new ELA teacher.  Please be prepared to discuss the story and present your project to an audience.

 

Background Information: 

  1. It is important to read Anne’s diary entry from Wednesday, July 8th, 1942, when she and Margot are asked by their father to pack their “rucksack” because they are going into hiding. Here you can get a good sense of what Anne and Margot packed.
  2. Since Anne lived in the past, almost 80 years ago, it may be hard to empathize with what Anne and her family had to go through. Tt is hoped that through this activity students will get a sense of what it was like to live in the 1940’s and what you could and could not take with them if they had to go into hiding. Understand that very large items, even if very dear or thought to be a necessity, had to be left behind. Also anything that would be noisy could not be taken. Also, since the family was fighting for their lives no pets could come along, either. Even though there was electricity and communication tools at that time, these were not as prevalent or depended on as they are today:  so NO electronics. 

 

The Project:  Going into Hiding-What Would You Take With You?

The backpack project should be completed in four steps to create both a graphic (packed backpack) and a written (letter to your teacher) product. 

During the Holocaust, which happened during WWII, Jewish people were given ten minutes to pack SOME of their belongings, were pulled out of their houses, and taken away from their homes. Others were forced into hiding to save their lives if they couldn’t leave their country that was occupied by the Nazis. If you knew you were going into hiding, what would you take with you? Remember, it

must fit in a backpack or a small suitcase. NO ELECTRONIC DEVICES! You should simulate this activity at home. Grab your backpack or duffle, and see how many items you can actually fit in it! Remember also the majority of the time you must be quiet, and you cannot draw any attention to yourself on the street walking to your hiding place and also when you are hiding!

Step 1-Deciding what you are taking:

Get your backpack or your duffle bag, and see what personal items fit into it. Those are the items you can take! You have to actually do this. You may want to take many precious items with you, but you can only take what you can fit in the small backpack, and you can also layer some clothes. However, you can’t look conspicuous or you will be stopped on the street and taken away. (Assume that, little by little, basic necessities such as soap, toothpaste, sheets, non-perishable food items, etc. would have been brought to your hiding place inconspicuously to your hiding place. CONCENTRATE ON PERSONAL ITEMS. Again, choose wisely. What fits in the knapsack goes.)

Obviously, these items are important to you, so tell me why you are taking them with you. Remember, you cannot leave you hiding place. You can’t run to CVS or order something from Amazon. YOU CANNOT GO OUTSIDE AT ALL! Only your protector(s) can bring you items, and since it is wartime, items will be scarce and in short supply. CHOOSE WISELY.

 

Step 2-Brainstorming what you are taking:

Now, write down what you can fit into your backpack. Again, be realistic. What fits is what goes. Also, make a list of the items you wanted to take but can’t. How does this make you feel? If it takes up all the room, it must be eliminated. NO ELECTRONIC DEVICES OF ANY KIND!

 

STEP 3-Creating the Backpack:

Using the clip art bagpack provided, on a separate sheet of paper/poster board/computer paper “pack” your backpack.   Paste pictures from the Internet, magazines, clip-art, or drawings what you cannot live without and have chosen to take with you. This is the creative aspect of the project, so put your best creative foot forward.

Step 4 - Letter to the Teacher

Lastly, you are going to write a well-constructed, detailed letter to your teacher explaining in depth what you would take into hiding with you and why and what you had to leave behind and how this reality makes you feel.

Follow the format below:

LETTER MUST BE TYPED

  • JUSTIFY the letter in Microsoft Word (Make sure your margins line up).
  • Use 1” margins. Indent paragraphs ½”. Do not include a lot of extra spaces between paragraphs.
  • Use “times new roman” 12.
  • DOUBLE SPACE THE TEXT. (Select format, paragraph, then “double” under line spacing.)
  • RER: Read, Edit, and Revise your work before you hand in the final draft.

Example: 

May 15, 2013 (Date)

(Skip a line.)

Dear Ms. Teacher (Salutation:  Start with “dear: and then insert an honorific title plus the teacher’s name.),

(Skip a line.)

BODY PARAGRAPH 1.  What items are you taking?  BODY # 1-You need a topic sentence, so state what you could fit in the knapsack, and why you have chosen these particular items. Think: Are there memories attached to them, or did you choose them to keep you busy? Explain what fit and why you chose these particular items.

BODY PARAGRAPH 2.  What items did you try to take, but couldn’t? BODY # 2- You will need a topic sentence, so state there are items you had to leave behind. Mention items you wanted to take but had to leave behind. Also, describe or discuss the emotions you are feeling about having to leave certain possessions behind. Be detailed as Anne was in her diary entry about what she took with her into hiding. Remember she says that her memories are more important to her than her dresses, but you need to practical.

BODY PARAGRAPH 3 What has Anne or the time period taught you? BODY # 3-Reflect on your experience about learning about Anne Frank/the time period/WWII, etc. Did it affect you in anyway? Cause any emotions? Make you think about your life differently? Reflect on at least two things.

CLOSING LINES-You can restate a central idea or theme here.  This should be a mirror statement to the topic sentence in your first body paragraph.  Indicate how you have “proven” your topic statement, or summarize why the items chosen where most appropriate. 

(Skip a line.)

Sincerely (Complimentary Close),

(Leave three lines for your actual signature.)

Star Student (Type your name.)

8th Grade Suggested Lexile Range 880L-1130L GA College & Career Ready "Stretch" Lexile Bands 1010L to 1185L

Title

Author Last Name

Author First Name

Lexile Level

Required Selection

A Midsummer Night’s Dream

 Shakespeare

William

1080L

Fiction

A Good Man is Hard to Find

O’Connor

Flannery

1550L

A Wind in the Door

L’Engle

Madeleine

790L

Boy:  Tales of Childhood

Dahl

Roald

1020L

Catherine, Called Birdy

Cushman

Karen

1090L

Chasing Redbird

Creech

Sharon

790L

Clover

Sanders

Dori

820L

Devil’s Arithmetic

Yolen

Jane

730L

Drums, Girls, and Dangerous Pies

Sonnenblick

Jordan

940L

Fahrenheit 451

Bradlbury

Ray

800L

Frankenstein

Shelley

Mary

950L

Gathering Blue

Lowry

Lois

680L

Go Set a Watchmen

Lee

Harper

Hobbit, The

Tolkien

J.R.

1000L

I am Mordred

Springer

Nancy

840L

Jacob I Have Loved

Paterson

Katherine

880L

Magician’s Nephew, The

Lewis

C.S.

790L

Maus:  My Father Bleeds History

Spiegelman

Art

NP

Midwife’s Apprentice, The

Cushman

Karen

1150L

Of Mice and Men

Steinbeck

John

630L

Persepolis: The Story of a Childhood

Satrapi

Marjane

GN380L

Rescue Josh McQuire

Mikaelsen

Ben

Teacher’s Funeral, The

Peck

Richard

750L

Tobacco Road

Caldwell

Erskine

Westing Game, The

Raskin

Ellen

750L

Wicked

Maguire

Gregory

Year Without Michael, The

Pfeffer

Susan Beth

670L

Biography

Abraham Lincoln

Colbert

David

NC1110L

8th Grade Project - Choice of Porject A Midsummer Night's Dream

During the summer break, read the story A Midsummer Night’s Dream by William Shakespeare and then chose one of the following projects.  Your project will be due on the first day of school.  Please bring it with you and submit it to your new ELA teacher.  Please be prepared to discuss the story and present your project to an audience.

 

  1. News broadcast or article: Imagine you are an Athenian journalist who wants to report the events of A Midsummer Night’s Dream. 
    1. Broadcast
      1. Create a script for a 1 – 3 min. news story on a scene from A Midsummer Night’s Dream.
      2. The script should be typed, MLA style, double spaced. Speaking parts should be clearly labeled. Include textual references (min. 5).
  • Create a video file of your news broadcast.
  1. Submit the script which includes a link to your published video file.

    OR

  1. Newspaper article
    1. Write a 400 – 600-word article for a newspaper’s social column.
    2. Present in a “newspaper format.”
  • Include a photo.

  1. COMIC BOOK: adapt the story of A Midsummer Night’s Dream to a comic book format.
    1. Include all 5 acts of the play.
    2. Include text and illustrations (hand drawn or print).
    3. Assemble as a cohesive comic book story in a “book” format.

  1. CHILDREN’S BOOK: adapt the story of A Midsummer Night’s Dream so it is appropriate and engaging for children. Include all 5 acts of the play, illustrating the book with images, a cover, and unique binding.

  1. WEDDING PLANNER: Plan the wedding for the three couples that marry in the play: Theseus and Hippolyta, Demetrius and Helena, and Lysander and Hermia and present your wedding plan in a creative format. 

For this project you will assume the role of a wedding planner as you help one of the couples plan their wedding. Your project should include all of the following elements:

  1. Chose an appropriate wedding song that will be played once they are married.
  2. Include the song lyrics and a one-paragraph explanation for why you chose this song and why it is appropriate.
  3. Create wedding vows for both characters to say during the ceremony.
  4. Chose an appropriate place and theme for the wedding.
  5. Include an image of the location and the decorations for the wedding.
  6. Include a one-paragraph justification for your chosen location and decorations.
  7. Select a wedding gift for ALL three couples and include an image/drawing and written justification for each of the wedding gifts.

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Calendar

December 2018

Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat
1
2
3
4
  • Academic Committee Meeting
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
  • Project Exhibition Night
12
13
  • 5th Grade Field Trip to Fox
  • Board Meeting
14
  • Upper School Tour
  • Winter Solstice Arts Program
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
  • Last Day of 1st Semester
  • Intent to Re Enroll Form Due
  • Holiday Class Parties/Pajama Day LS/Ugly Sweater Day US
22
23
24
  • Winter Break
25
  • Winter Break
26
  • Winter Break
27
  • Winter Break
28
  • Winter Break
  • Finance Committee
29
  • Winter Break
30
  • Winter Break
31
  • Winter Break

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